Carl Safina’s work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. He has a PhD in ecology from Rutgers University.  Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit organization, The Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina.  His writing appears in The New York Times, Audubon, Orion, and other periodicals and on the Web at National Geographic News and Views, Huffington Post, and CNN.com.

For decades, Sonny Gruber’s shark lab has studied shark spawning. Less well known is that it’s been a major spawning area for some of the world’s major shark researchers, who arrived full of wide-eyed wonder and cut their teeth, so to speak, in the shadow of the shark master. And here is the shark master’s tale, masterfully told.